Max – in memory

Max the Siberian lynx is a retired exhibit cat

In Memory 2017

What can I say?  Whether it’s 10-month-old Esteban or now 22-year-old Max the Eurasian Lynx, writing these memorials and saying good-bye never gets easier.

But what it does give me, gives us, is a break from the grief to remember what made each of them so special.  Sharing the story of their life and how you helped us make each day count is how we get through these hard times.  So, thank you for letting me share just how wonderful Max, the Eurasian Lynx was.

In Max’s early years, he was an exhibit cat. He traveled around the country to schools, Renaissance Festivals and auto shows.  When Max was no longer compliant for his owner, he was fortunately retired to our Sanctuary in 1999.

Max was a happy boy that had affection for his caregivers, but even more affection toward other animals.  He was friendly to his neighbors, and a love connection formed between he and Misha the cougar in 2001.  They lived together ever since. Their friendship was featured in National Geographic Kids magazine, as well as other articles.

Max was a cat that was very at peace with himself.  He would purr at his caregivers, call to his friends across the sanctuary, and always followed Misha around with his signature Max grunt, followed by presenting his rear end.  Even though it was a compliment, Misha never perceived it that way and would give a playful swat to his back side.

His favorite spot in his habitat was up on the hill where he could watch other cats and keep an eye out for the food cart.  Meal time was an exciting time for Max and something he always looked forward to.

As he aged, he had chronic kidney disease and some muscle atrophy.  Caretakers and your support provided Max with the stairs he needed to still enjoy climbing his perches and platforms.

In the last days, Max was very weak, but still had glimmers of that signature personality.  He was calm and comfortable, but his body could not keep up with his internal beaming personality.  He deserved to be free where he could shine as bright as he needed.

I know Misha still feels his warmth with every ray of sun, his head butt as she cuddles in her hammock, and hears his famous grunt as the wind blows.

Misha is doing well on her own since his passing.  She’s spending a lot of time in her tallest hammock on her tallest platform.  She purrs when we talk to her and seems peaceful knowing she had a long, lovely life with her dear friend.

Max, it is not an understatement when we say you were happy with yourself.  That is truly a special gift. Shine bright forever and always.

 

 

Max’s Story

Misha and Max lo resMax, a Eurasian lynx, was the typical exhibition cat.  He was owned by an exhibitor that took him to schools and other events for show. One day, though, Max made it quite clear that he no longer was interested in the leash or the profession. Luckily, the exhibitor found The Wildcat Sanctuary and chose to retire Max to our Sanctuary.

Max is a well-adjusted cat, but he will still growl today if he even sees a leash.  His memory of his former life stays with himMax.

At The Wildcat Sanctuary, Max now enjoys roaming a 7,000 square foot habitat with the love of his life, Misha, a cougar. It was quite a surprise to us all when we noticed Max was grooming Misha through the fence.  So, one day, we allowed for a play date and they have been together ever since.  It makes us feel wonderful being able to provide companionship for life for our rescues, even if they are from another species.  Sometimes those are the best, most lasting, friendships.